Proteomics International


Project title: Manufacturing the next generation in vitro diagnostic device to predict diabetic kidney disease

Diabetes is the primary cause of kidney disease, with over 95% of patients having no symptoms. Globally, 463 million adults have diabetes with one-third having diabetic kidney disease (DKD), which if untreated can lead to dialysis or kidney transplant. In Australia there are 1.3 million people with diabetes with the treatment of kidney disease costing $1 billion annually.

Existing tests are limited and only diagnose DKD once significant kidney damage has occurred. In contrast, extensive clinical studies show the Proteomics International (Proteomics) (ASX: PIQ) PromarkerD test correctly predicted 86% of patients with diabetes who developed DKD within four years. 

The patented PromarkerD test is an in vitro diagnostic immunoassay, which predicts the onset of DKD via an advanced cloud-based software algorithm by measuring three plasma protein biomarkers, combined with three routinely available clinical variables (age, HDL-cholesterol and estimated glomerular filtration rate). Patients identified at high-risk of disease can receive proactive early intervention to slow DKD progression and lessen the need for expensive dialysis and transplants, while those identified as low-risk could avoid unnecessary adoption of new therapeutic treatments, potentially saving lives and the Australian healthcare system hundreds of millions of dollars annually.

This project will further develop the Proteomics patented PromarkerD test, which predicts DKD, and will also establish an onshore manufacturing capability.


      BMTH Project Round: Four

      State: Western Australia

      Project Partner: Not applicable

      Funding:

      • MTPConnect Grant: $413,516
      • Industry Contribution: $955,516

      Duration: May 2022 - March 2023


        Websites: Proteomics International & PromarkerD

        LinkedIn: Proteomics International & PromarkerD

        Twitter: @ProteomicsI

        Contact: Richard Lipscombe